Harpies, Fechters and Quines Festival 2017

This year’s Harpies, Fechters and Quines Festival focuses on women and film. Events can be booked via Eventbrite

Tales of One City

We’ve very pleased to announce the programme for this year’s Harpies, Fechters and Quines Festival, organised in partnership with the Glasgow Women’s Library and the Edinburgh Womens’ Group Bonnie Fechters.

This year the focus is on women and film – Reel Women – and includes many free film screenings. Come along and meet like-minded folk, learn something new or just sit back and enjoy.

Browse the full programme and book your tickets via Eventbrite
www.edinburghreads.eventbrite.co.uk

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Book review: Norse Mythology by Neil Gaiman

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Norse Mythology by Neil Gaiman

Published: February 2017 by Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 9781408886816

Gaiman uses simple language to tell these stories but they are deeply compelling and evocative nonetheless. Old as these tales are – and well known to me – his simple, elegant words paint new and vivid pictures in my mind. Thor with his red beard and comic stupidity; beautiful, haughty Freya… and Loki – who “makes the world more interesting but less safe”.

There’s a lot of humour and lightheartedness in these myths but the whole mood is somewhat darkened by Gaiman’s prophecy of Ragnarok:

“This will be the age of cruel winds, the age of people who become as wolves, who prey upon each other, who are no better than wild beasts. Twilight will come to the world, and the places where the humans live will fall into ruins, flaming briefly, then crashing down and crumbling into ash and devastation”

I found this passage eerily familiar. Are we now living through the end times? Is Ragnarok almost upon us?…

I devoured this book like a wolf devouring the moon. Neil Gaiman’s reputation as a Bard of Epic Standing is now assured in my opinion. Highly recommended.

Review via: A Very Fine Library

Have you read anything you love (or really hate) lately? Something you’d like to recommend? Write us a review and send it in for publication on this site! 

Call for contributions

Do you work in one of Edinburgh’s library and information services? Or somewhere in the wider Lothians area? ELISA would love to hear from you.

We’re always looking for submissions for publication on this site. Please send us information on your events and exhibits, details of training sessions and visits, or just tell us something about your typical day.

All contributions gratefully received. Please contact JA Condie (your Webmaster!)

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Little Free Libraries – urban decoration for affluent areas?

What are your thoughts on Little Free Libraries? Please comment below

A Very Fine Library

Here’s an interesting looking study published by the Journal of Radical Librarianship. I tend to have no time for librarians who, in relation to LFLs, whine “They’re not really libraries. They’re just book swaps!”. That, to me, is semantics. Books is books.

However, this article makes the point that these small book collections don’t appear in neighbourhoods where they could be of most value. In Toronto at least, they tend to be confined to more affluent areas. This is understandable in a way since the structures sold by the company Little Free Libraries are not cheap. People in poorer areas are likely less able to afford them and those who can may be unwilling to set them up too far away from their own homes.

c47d00fa20e2947527a90061eb42398bI don’t really have much knowledge on this topic but during my recent trip to the US (Florida and New Orleans) I saw several little neighbourhood book swaps and they appeared…

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New Audiobook Service

Tales of One City

Edinburgh Libraries has added a new downloadable audiobook service to our suite of online resources. uLIBRARY is a growing collection of over 150 great British popular fiction audiobooks. Highlights include The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins and fabulous titles by Ann Cleeves, Quintin Jardine, Denise Mina and Jo Nesbo

You can borrow up to three titles at a time for 21 days and they are self returning so no fines. Use the uLIBRARY on your computer or through its Apple or Android apps.

Edinburgh Libraries now has four downloadable audio services – OverDrive, OneClickdigital, BorrowBox and uLIBRARY. All provide a different selection of publishers and authors to give you access to as full a range as possible. OverDrive and OneClickdigital have children’s and teen titles as well as adult content. Full instructions for using all of the services can be found on our Your Library site.

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CodeYourFuture: how we embrace diversity in our coding school for refugees and asylum seekers

Mozafar Haider Ibrahim is an Edinburgh-based software developer and a CodeYourFuture mentor. He describes how the organisation celebrates, and benefits from, the diversity of all the people involved in it: https://blogs.gov.scot/digital/2017/03/21/codeyourfuture-embracing-diversity/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+gov%2FmuIS+%28Digital+Blog+Posts%29

CodeYourFuture-poster

via Digital Scotland

Free magazines anyone?

Tales of One City

Edinburgh Libraries online magazine collection just got even better! We’ve added 21 new titles to our Zinio service giving you a fantastic 130 popular magazines to choose from. New titles include:

Women’s magazines
Current affairs to motoringTechnology to men’s magazines

Check out the whole list of available titles as well as instructions about how to access Zinio on your device on our Your Library website.

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